Members

Members A-M

Members N-Z

Kenneth A. Barbee, Ph.D.

Associate Professor
School of Biomedical Engineering, Science, and Health Systems
Drexel University
Email: barbee@coe.drexel.edu
Website: http://www.biomed.drexel.edu/new04/content/academics/faculty/dsp_faculty_details.cfm?RECID=111
Role of mechanical forces in normal physiology and Chronic & acute pathophysiology. Current projects use in vitro cell culture models to study the response of endothelium to dynamic shear stress, the contribution of vascular smooth muscle injury ot restenosis following angioplasty, and the cellular mechanisms of central nervous system trauma.

John L. Bassani, Ph.D.

Richard H. and S.L. Gabel Professor Mechanical Engineering
Chair, Department of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics
University of Pennsylvania
Email: bassani@seas.upenn.edu
Website: http://www.seas.upenn.edu/directory/profile.php?ID=6
Interface mechanics – the relationship between discrete and continuum properties of heterogenous solids; Plastic deformation of crystals; Fracture mechanics along interfaces between ductile and brittle solids under mixed-mode loading (tension vs. shear) and high-temperature conditions.

Haim H. Bau, Ph.D.

Professor
Department of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics
University of Pennsylvania
Email: bau@seas.upenn.edu
Website: http://www.seas.upenn.edu/directory/profile.php?ID=7
Microfluidics and lab on a chip technology: Development of microfluidic devices for biosensing; the use of electric and magnetic fields to transport and stir liquids and particles; the modeling of mass transport and biological interactions in microfluidic systems.

Ian A. Blair, Ph.D.

A.N. Richards Professor of Pharmacology
Director of the Center for Cancer Pharmacology
University of Pennsylvania
Email: ian@spirit.gcrc.upenn.edu
Website: http://www.med.upenn.edu/blairlab/faculty_blair.shtml
Dr. Blair was recruited to the University of Pennsylvania in January 1997 from Vanderbilt University. He holds an endowed chair as the A.N. Richards Professor of Pharmacology and is Director of the Center for Cancer Pharmacology. Dr Blair’s current research is involved with the development of molecular biomarkers to elucidate mechanisms of carcinogenesis with particular emphasis on lipid peroxidation.

Dawn A. Bonnell, Ph.D.

Professor
Department of Materials Science
University of Pennsylvania
Email: bonnell@lrsm.upenn.edu
Website: http://www.seas.upenn.edu/~bonnell/people/
Nanometer scale phenomena at Interfaces; atomic imaging; STM image theory of oxides; calculation of tunneling spectra; electronic structure and bonding related to nm variation in optical, magnetic, electrical, and mechanical properties; in situ nanoscale electromagnetic fields during device operation; local polarization and charge compensation in ferroelectric nanostructures; charge mediated assembly of nanoelectronics; nanoscale templating and biomolecular response function.

Lawrence F. Brass, M.D., Ph.D.

Professor
Department of Medicine
Department of Pathology
Department of Pharmacology
University of Pennsylvania
Email: brass@mail.med.upenn.edu
Website: http://www.med.upenn.edu/apps/faculty/index.php/g5165284/p15732
Molecular mechanisms underlying vascular biology and pathology, in particular, the signal transduction pathways that allow platelets and endothelial cells to respond to extracellular events. Topics currently under investigation include: Protease-activated G protein coupled receptors, including the thrombin receptor; The role of the G protein, Gz; The role of the prototypical PH-domain-containing protein, pleckstrin; The role in platelet activation and endothelial cell biology of Eph tyrosine kinase receptors and their ligands, and their potential role in interactions between platelets, endothelial cells and leukocytes in the vascular wall.

Gershon Buchsbaum, Ph.D.

Professor
Department of Bioengineering
University of Pennsylvania
Email: gershon@seas.upenn.edu
Website: http://www.seas.upenn.edu/directory/profile.php?ID=12
Human visual perception; visual signal processing and image coding. Modeling of retinal visual system neural architecture and function.

Jason Burdick, Ph.D.

Professor
Department of Bioengineering
University of Pennsylvania
Email: burdick2@seas.upenn.edu
Website: http://www.seas.upenn.edu/directory/profile.php?ID=13
Jason’s research interests include developing degradable polymeric biomaterials that can be used for tissue engineering, drug delivery, and fundamental polymer studies. The platform polymer technology involves the development of multifunctional monomers that form degradable crosslinked networks via a radical polymerization. Specific targets of his research include: scaffolding for cell and growth factor delivery in bone and cartilage regeneration; controlling stem cell differentiation and growth factor delivery; and investigating the influence of monomer structure on resulting network macroscopic and microscopic properties.

Yongwon Choi, Ph.D.

Leonard Jarett Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
University of Pennsylvania
Email: ychoi3@mail.med.upenn.edu
Website: http://www.med.upenn.edu/apps/faculty/index.php/g275/p14632
Dr. Choi’s is interested in the molecular analysis of the osteoimmune system. His research focuses on two cell types: dendritic cells and osteoclasts. Specifically, he investigates the ways in which dendritic cells regulate T cell activation or tolerance, and how osteoclasts differentiate from their precursors and mature osteoclasts are activated to resorb bone. Finally, Dr. Choi’s lab is interested in how bone and the immune system cross-talk with each other.

Mortimer M. Civan, M.D.

Professor
Cell and Molecular Biology Graduate Program
Program in Cellular Physiology
Bioengineering Graduate Group
University of Pennsylvania
Email: civan@mail.med.upenn.edu
Website: http://www.med.upenn.edu/physiol/m_civan_bio.html
The mechanisms of movement of solutes and water across epithelial membranes, the regulation of that movement and the clinical implications of altering the underlying mechanisms and regulation. Our current focus is on the mecanisms and regulation of aqueous humor inflow into, and exit from, the eye, and their implications for the treatment of glaucoma.

Russell J. Composto, Ph.D.

Professor
Undergraduate Chair, Materials Science and Engineering
Department of Computer and Information Science
University of Pennsylvania
Email: composto@lrsm.upenn.edu
Website: http://www.seas.upenn.edu/directory/profile.php?ID=18
Polymer surface and interface phenomena; Polymeric and ceramic coatings; Surface engineering in polymer blends via polymer adsorption, segregation and ion beam stitching; Thermodynamics and dynamics of macromolecules in confined spaces; stability of thin film coatings.

John C. Crocker, Ph.D.

Skirkanich Assistant Professor
Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
University of Pennsylvania
Email: jcrocker@seas.upenn.edu
Website: http://www.seas.upenn.edu/~jcrocker
My research interests lie in biophysics, at the border between molecular and cellular biology with soft condensed matter physics. My group’s expertise lies in figuring out how to make careful mechanical measurements on very small objects; to figure out what’s going on in the micro-world. We use novel physical methods to probe interesting biological systems such as the cytoskeleton and complex macromolecules. Alternatively, we can use the power of biological systems to build interesting soft-matter experiments and engineer useful devices.

Susan B. Davidson, Ph.D.

Professor
Department of Computer and Information Science
University of Pennsylvania
Email: susan@cis.upenn.edu
Website: http://www.cis.upenn.edu/~susan/home.html
Databases; data models and languages, complex object systems, database transformations, data integration, data warehousing, transactions and updates, constraints, biomedical databases.

Peter F. Davies, Ph.D.

Director, Institute for Medicine and Engineering
Robinette Foundation Professor of Cardiovascular Medicine
Professor, Department of Bioengineering
University of Pennsylvania
Email: pfd@pobox.upenn.edu
Website: https://www.seas.upenn.edu/directory/profile.php?ID=146
Effects of hemodynamic forces on endothelial cell structure and function; vascular biology; pathology of atherosclerosis; vascular cell-cell communication.

Natacha DePaola, Ph.D.

Dean
Armour College of Engineering
Illinois Institute of Technology
Email: depaola@rpi.edu
Website: http://www.iit.edu/engineering/about/message.shtml
Biofluid Dynamics, Cell Mechanics, and Cell and Tissue Engineering. Fundamental aspects of fluid mechanics and mass transport involved in the modulation of mammalian cell function, with special attention to the cells in the arterial circulation. Development of experimental models and theoretical analysis that describe the dynamic process occurring at the arterial surface in early atherosclerosis.

Scott L. Diamond, Ph.D.

Professor
Departments of Chemical Engineering
Director, Biotechnology Program
University of Pennsylvania
Email: sld@seas.upenn.edu
Website: http://ime.med.upenn.edu/?page_id=24
Endothelial cell mechano-biology; drug and gene delivery; thrombosis and thrombolysis; biotransport phenomena.

Dennis E. Discher, Ph.D.

Dennis E. Discher, Ph.D.
Robert D. Bent Professor
Departments of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Bioengineering, Mechanical Eng’g. and Applied Mechanics
University of Pennsylvania
Email: discher@seas.upenn.edu
Website: http://www.seas.upenn.edu/~discher/

Ivan J. Dmochowski, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor
Department of Chemistry
Bioinorgaic, Bioorganic, Biophysical Chemistry
University of Pennsylvania
Email: ivandmo@sas.upenn.edu
Website: http://www.sas.upenn.edu/~ivandmo/
Our lab is developing chemical and biophysical tools to study and manipulate complex biological systems. Projects span many areas of synthetic organic, inorganic, and biophysical chemistry; molecular, cell, and developmental biology; and bioengineering. We are particularly interested in developing new technologies for biomolecular imaging and the fabrication of functional bio-nanomaterials.

Paul Ducheyne, Ph.D.

Professor
Department of Bioengineering
Department of Orthopedic Surgery
University of Pennsylvania
Email: ducheyne@seas.upenn.edu
Website: http://www.seas.upenn.edu/directory/profile.php?ID=26
Biomaterials and Tissues Engineering; in vitro synthesis of bone tissue; controlled release of growth factors and effect of material selection; bioactive ceramics; surface analysis, electro chemistry and biocompatability of metallic biomaterials.

James H. Eberwine, Ph.D.

Professor
Department of Pharmacology
Department of Psychiatry
University of Pennsylvania
Email: eberwine@upenn.edu
Website: http://www.med.upenn.edu/apps/faculty/index.php/g275/p5441
Basic mechanisms of neuronal plasticity using rat and mouse models; use of molecular biological approaches to understand the etiology and maintenance of human neurological and psychiatric diseases.

David Eckmann, Ph.D., M.D.

Professor
Department of Anesthesia
University of Pennsylvania
Email: deckmann@mail.med.upenn.edu
Website: http://www.med.upenn.edu/apps/faculty/index.php/g319/p5523>More Information
Convection-diffusion interactions, interfacial dynamics and mass transport in cardiopulmonary biofluid dynamics applications such as intravascular gas embolism and pulmonary gas transport. The work invloves bench experimentation, in vitro and in vivo physiology, and computational mathematical modeling.

Dawn M. Elliott, Ph.D.

Associate Professor
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery
Associate Professor
Department of Bioengineering
University of Pennsylvania
Email: delliott@mail.med.upenn.edu
Website: http://www.med.upenn.edu/apps/faculty/index.php/g275/p9560
Biomechanical function of orthopaedic soft tissues in health, aging, degeneration, injury and healing, with special focus on the intervertebral disc. Mathematical models and mechanical tests in combination with biochemical composition and microstructural measurements for studies of complex material behaviors of tissues, including anisotropy, nonlinearity, inhomogeneity, and viscoelasticity of tendon, ligament, meniscus, and articular cartilage.

Charles L. Epstein, Ph.D.

Thomas A. Scott Professor of Mathematics
Chair, Graduate Group in Applied Mathematics and Computational Science
University of Pennsylvania
Email: delliott@mail.med.upenn.edu
Website: http://www.math.upenn.edu/~cle/>More.
Mathematical analysis and its applications to problems in medical image acquisition and analysis,  signal processing, electromagnetic theory, and population Biology.

Jonathon A. Epstein, M.D.

Professor and Chair
Department of Cell & Developmental Biology
Email: epsteinj@mail.med.upenn.edu
Website: http://www.med.upenn.edu/apps/faculty/index.php/g275/p12834
The genetic and molecular processes that regulate cardiac formation and function, with special attention to the pathways likely to be disrupted in human congenital heart disease, specifically, the transcriptional mechanisms of members of the Pax family of transcription factors.

Aron B. Fisher, Ph.D.

Director, Institute for Environmental Medicine
Professor of Physiology and Environmental Medicine, and Medicine
University of Pennsylvania
Email: abf@mail.med.upenn.edu
Website: http://www.med.upenn.edu/ifem/
Membrane protein and phospholipid trafficking in lung epithelial cells; control of lung lipoprotein synthesis and secretion; lipid and protein oxidation in ischemia-reperfusion injury.

Garret FitzGerald, M.D.

Chair, Department of Pharmacology
Professor, Cardiovascular Medicine
Professor, Medicine and Pharmacology
Director, Center for Experimental Therapeutics
Director, Clinical Research Center
University of Pennsylvania
Email: garret@upenn.edu
Website: http://www.med.upenn.edu/fitzgeraldlab/
Isoeicosanoids; Eicosanoid Receptor Biology; The Pharmacology of Cyclooxygenase Inhibition; The Pharmacology of Antithrombotic Drugs.

Yale E. Goldman, M.D., Ph.D.

Director, Pennsylvania Muscle Institute
Co-Director, Nano/Bio Interface Center
Professor of Physiology
University of Pennsylvania
Email: goldmany@mail.med.upenn.edu
Website: http://www.med.upenn.edu/physiol/y_goldman_bio.html
The molecular mechanism of muscle contraction, cell motility and motor proteins. Techniques being developed for organized macromolecular assemblies include rapid reaction kinetics, dynamic structural spectroscopy and time resolved electron microscopy.

Mark Goulian, Ph.D.

Associate Professor
Department of Biology
Department of Physics and Astronomy
University of Pennsylvania
Email: goulian@dept.physics.upenn.edu
Website: http://www.bio.upenn.edu/faculty/goulian/
Dr. Goulian joined the Physics department at Penn in August 2000 from the Laboratory of Cellular Biophysics at Rockefeller University. His research is focused on two-component signaling in bacteria. Dr. Goulian is exploring the regulation of endogenous cross-talk between signaling modules, the evolvability of two-component systems, and the implementation of synthetic signaling networks.

Daniel A. Hammer, Ph.D.

Professor
Department of Bioengineering
University of Pennsylvania
Email: hammer@seas.upenn.edu
Website: http://www.seas.upenn.edu/directory/profile.php?ID=37
Cellular bioengineering, cell adhesion in inflammation, angiogenesis and cardiovascular disease, mechanisms of viral entry, materials design for drug delivery in the microcirculation.

Erika Holzbaur, Ph.D.

Professor
Department of Physiology
University of Pennsylvania
Email: holzbaur@mail.med.upenn.edu
Website: http://www.med.upenn.edu/physiol/e_holzbaur_bio.html
Our laboratory is focused on the microtubule-based motor cytoplamic dynein and its activator dynactin. We are interested in the mechanisms of force production and motor function, mechanisms of cargo coupling and regulation, effects of dynein and dynactin on dynamics of the cytoskeleton, and the analysis of neurodegenerative dieseases resulting from impariments in dynein/dynactin function.

Howard H. Hu, Ph.D.

Professor
Department of Mechanical Engineering & Applied Mechanics
University of Pennsylvania
Email: hhu@seas.upenn.edu
Website: http://www.me.upenn.edu/faculty/hu.html
Modeling of complex flows with multiphase of polymeric fluids, computational fluid dynamics, hydrodynamic stability.

Kaori Ihida-Stansbury, Ph.D.

Institute for Medicine and Engineering
1010 Vagelos Research Labs
3340 Smith Walk
Philadelphia, PA 19104-6383
Office: 215-898-7554
Fax: 215-573-6815
Lab: 215-746-6098
Email: ikaori@mail.med.upenn.edu
Website: http://www.med.upenn.edu/apps/faculty/index.php/g5455356/p5212416

My research interest is to understand how microenvironmental cues regulate stem/progenitor cell differentiation. Currently, my research is focusing on lung vascular SMC differentiation controlled by extracellular matrix properties: stiffness (biophysical property) and TGF-beta signaling (biochemical property). To examine this, I have utilized a decellularized lung scaffolds culture system and determine 3-D matrix signal on cell differentiation. In the long term, I hope that the information gathered using this approach will provide fundamental information necessary to understand the regeneration of the lung and to design more effective therapies.

Paul Janmey, Ph.D.

Professor
Department of Physiology
University of Pennsylvania
Email: janmey@mail.med.upenn.edu
Website: https://www.seas.upenn.edu/directory/profile.php?ID=149
Cell mechanics and the cytoskeleton; Signaling by inositol phospholipids; Hydrodynamics of biological macromolecules; Mechanism of protein self-assembly.

Mark Kahn, M.D.

Associate Professor
Department of Medicine
Division of Cardiology
University of Pennsylvania
Email: markkahn@mail.med.upenn.edu
Website: http://www.med.upenn.edu/kahnlab/
My laboratory is focused on two recently discovered vascular roles of the Syk and SLP-76 (immunoreceptor) singnaling pathway; lymphatic vascular developmental and platelet activation by collagen during arterial thrombosis.

Randall D. Kamien, Ph.D.

Professor
Chair of the Graduate Group
Department of Physics and Astronomy
University of Pennsylvania
Email: kamien@dept.physics.upenn.edu
Website: http://www.physics.upenn.edu/~kamien/
Liquid Crystals, Biomaterials, Polymers, Topological Defects, Complex Fluids, High-Tc superconductors, disordered systems, Classical and Quantum Statistical Mechanics.

Frederick S. Kaplan, M.D.

Professor
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery
University of Pennsylvania
Email: Frederick.Kaplan@uphs.upenn.edu
Website: http://www.med.upenn.edu/apps/faculty/index.php/g275/p8778
Molecular Orthopaedics; molecular genetics of Osteogenesis; fibrodysplasia ossificans; progressiva and progressive osseous heteroplasia; the establishment of effective treatments for these currently untreatable disorders.

Junhyong Kim, Ph.D.

Professor
Department of Biology
University of Pennsylvania
Email: junhyong@sas.upenn.edu
Website: http://www.bio.upenn.edu/faculty/kim/
Evolution of gene regulation and developmental systems, computational infrastructure for deducing the tree of life, comparative genomics and molecular evolution.

J. Yasha Kresh, Ph.D.

Professor and Research Director
Dept. of Cardiothoracic Surgery
Professor of Medicine
Director, Cardiovascular Biophysics
Drexel University College of Medicine
Email: jkresh@mail.med.upenn.edu
Website: http://www.pages.drexel.edu/~jk45/lab/yashakresh.htm
Cardiac mechanotransduction in heart-failure and recovery; Topobiology of cellular cardiomyoplasty (milieu-dependent cardiomyocyte differentiation and adaptation); Imaging and assessment of remodeled human hearts (structure and biomechanics); Effects of cardiac-assist devices on cellular structure, function and reverse-remodeling; Surgical cardioplasty (design of ventricular reshaping and constrainment devices); Computer-assisted surgical planning, design of smart sensors and manipulators with heptic (tactile) feedback.

Matthew J. Lazzara, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor
Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
Department of Bioengineering
Department of Medicine
University of Pennsylvania
Email: mlazzara@seas.upenn.edu
Website: http://www.seas.upenn.edu/directory/profile.php?ID=53
ErbB-mediated cell signaling; Cell signaling in the renal proximal tubule.

Robert J. Levy, Ph.D.

Professor
Department of Pediatrics
Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia
Email: levyr@email.chop.edu
Website: http://www.med.upenn.edu/apps/faculty/index.php/g20000220/p2954
Site specific therapy for cardiovascular disease, focusing on valve replacement surgery, cardiac arrhythmias and post-angioplasty injury.

Brian Litt, M.D.

Associate Professor
Department of Medicine
Department of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine
University of Pennsylvania
Email: littb@mail.med.upenn.edu
Website: http://www.seas.upenn.edu/~littlab/Site/Home.html> More
Dr. Litt’s research focuses on his clinical work as a neurologist specializing in the care and treatment of individuals with epilepsy. Projects include: (1) Interpretation of brain signals in disease. A major thrust at this time is seizure prediction from intracranial recordings, leading to the development of an implantable brain device to predict seizures and arrest their genesis prior to their clinical expression; (2) Localization of seizures in extratemporal epilepsy; (3) Minimally invasive tools for acquisition and display of high fidelity electrophysiologic recording; and (4) automated systems for intensive monitoring neurologic function.

Tom C. Lubensky

Professor
Department of Physics
University of Pennsylvania
Email: tom@physics.upenn.edu
Website: http://www.physics.upenn.edu/people/standing-faculty/tom-lubensky
Elastic, dynamic, rheological, and statistical properties of soft materials including liquid crystals, complex fluids, polymer and biopolymer networks, and DNA-lipid complexes.

Jennifer R. Lukes, Ph.D.

William K. Gemmill Term Assistant Professor
Department of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics
University of Pennsylvania
Email: jrlukes@seas.upenn.edu
Website: http://www.seas.upenn.edu/~nanolab/
Nanoscale thermal, fluid, and mass transport; molecular dynamics simulation; laser-based materials characterization; field-directed patterning for nanofabrication; flow measurement in confined geometries; micro- and nanoscale engineering.

David Luzzi, Ph.D.

Professor
Department of Materials Science and Engineering
University of Pennsylvania
Email: http
Website: http://www.seas.upenn.edu/mse/fac/luzzi.html
Structure/Property Relationships at Nanometer Length Scales; Intermetallic Coumpounds and Composites; Interfaces: Structure, Diffusion, Phase Transformations and Mechanical Properties; Carbon Nanotubes; Electron Microscopy.

Susan S. Margulies, Ph.D.

Professor
Department of Bioengineering
University of Pennsylvania
Email: margulie@seas.upenn.edu
Website: http://www.seas.upenn.edu/be/dir/details/Susan_Margulies_details.html
Influence of mechanical stimuli in brain and lung injury, soft tissue constitutive properties, non-invasive imaging techniques to measure in vivo tissue motion, computational injury modeling.

Robert L. Mauck, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery
Department of Bioengineering
University of Pennsylvania
Email: lemauck@mail.med.upenn.edu
Website: http://www.seas.upenn.edu/directory/profile.php?ID=150
Engineering functional equivalents for musculoskeletal tissue engineering applications with particular focus on articular cartilage and meniscus; Mesenchymal stem cell mechanobiology and signal transduction in chondrogenic differentiation; Design of novel bioreactor systems to recapitulate the complex loading environment of diarthrodial joints; Fabrication and application of anistropic nanofibrous scaffolds for directed tissue growth

Michael J. May, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor
Department of Bioengineering
University of Pennsylvania
Email: maym@vet.upenn.edu
Website: http://www.med.upenn.edu/apps/faculty/index.php/g20000320/p3262231
The principal research interest of this lab is to understand the molecular basis of signal transduction pathways that control gene expression in immune and inflammatory responses and to determine how deregulation of these mechanisms contribute to disease. Our work focuses on the inducible transcription factor NF-kB that is critical for a range of cellular functions including inflammation, innate and adaptive immunity and lymphocyte development.

David F. Meaney, Ph.D.

Professor and Chair
Department of Bioengineering
University of Pennsylvania
Email: dmeaney@seas.upenn.edu
Website: http://www.seas.upenn.edu/be/dir/details/Dave_Meaney_details.html
Mechanotransduction in cells of the CNS; Experimental and computational modeling in tissue mechanics, focusing on the brain; Applications of both approaches to central nervous system injury.

Emile R. Mohler, III, M.D.

Director of Vascular Medicine
University of Pennsylvania Health System
Email: emmd@mail.med.upenn.edu
Website: http://www.med.upenn.edu/apps/faculty/index.php/g5165284/p17754
The focus of my laboratory is in the area of vascular disease, with specific emphasis on calcification. Clinical diseases such as aortic valve stenosis and peripheral arterial disease are addressed through our research.

John M. Murray, M.D., Ph.D.

Associate Professor
Department of Cell & Developmental Biology
University of Pennsylvania
Email: murray@anat3D1.anatomy.upenn.edu
Website: http://www.med.upenn.edu/apps/faculty/index.php/g20001040/p439
Molecular motors and and mechanochemical transduction, investigated by structural studies and molecular engineering.

Vladimir Muzykantov, M.D., Ph.D.

Associate Professor
Department of Pharmacology and Institute for Environmental Medicine
University of Pennsylvania
Email: muzykant@mail.med.upenn.edu
Website: http://www.med.upenn.edu/apps/faculty/index.php/g5455356/p7571
Drug delivery in the bloodstream. Targeting of drugs, enzymes and genes to the vascular endothelium and to the lung (anti-oxidant protection, regulation of fibrinolysis and immune functions of lungs). Physiology and pathophysiology of vascular endothelium, mechanisms of oxidative injury to the endothelial cells. Endothelial surface determinants and heterogeneity.

Philip Nelson, Ph.D.

Professor of Physics
Department of Physics
University of Pennsylvania
Email: nelson@dept.physics.upenn.edu
Website: http://www.physics.upenn.edu/~pcn/
Physics of artificial biomembranes, biopolymers such as DNA, and other soft condensed matter systems; nonlinear dynamics, including pattern formation; biophysical fluid dynamics.

Michael A. Pack, M.D.

Associate Professor
Department of Medicine
University of Pennsylvania
Email: mpack@mail.med.upenn.edu
Website: http://www.med.upenn.edu/apps/faculty/index.php/g345/p12874
Work in the Pack laboratory is focused on the identification of genes that regulate digestive organ development and physiology. We work exclusively with the zebrafish system. Using a combined approach of genetic and embryological analyses, we aim to characterize novel genes or novel functions of known genes that regulate proliferation, differentiation and maintenance of epithelial cells within the pancreas, liver and intestine.

George J. Pappas, Ph.D.

Professor
Department of Electrical and Systems Engineering
Department of Computer and Information and Sciences
University of Pennsylvania
Email: pappasg@ee.upenn.edu
Website: http://www.seas.upenn.edu/~pappasg/
Hybrid systems, hierarchical control systems, embedded real-time systems, nonlinear systems, geometric control theory, robotics, unmanned aerial vehicles, formation control systems, distributed control of multi-agent systems.

Michael S. Parmacek, M.D.

Chief, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine
Department of Medicine
University of Pennsylvania
Email: michael.parmacek@uphs.upenn.edu
Website: http://www.uphs.upenn.edu/cardio/faculty/parmacek.html
Transcriptional programs and signaling pathways that regulate vascular smooth muscle cell and cardiac myocyte development and differentiation.

Warren S. Pear, M.D., Ph.D.

Assistant Professor
Department of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine
University of Pennsylvania
Email: wpear@mail.med.upenn.edu
Website: http://www.med.upenn.edu/apps/faculty/index.php/g20000320/p8944
Tumor Biology; Signal Transduction; Leukemogenesis: including Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia and myeloproliferative diseases; Hematopoietic Stem Cell Biology; Gene Therapy and Retroviral Targeting.

Ellen Pure, Ph.D.

Professor
Molecular and Cellular Oncogenesis Program and Immunology Program
The Wistar Institute
Email: epure@vet.upenn.edu
Website: http://www.med.upenn.edu/apps/faculty/index.php/g20000320/p2386
The laboratory is investigating the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying inflammation, which is known to play a significant role in a wide array of diseases, including atherosclerosis, asthma, rheumatoid arthritis, autoimmunity, and even cancer. One closely studied molecule, CD44, may represent a promising target for new anti-inflammatory drug therapies.

Daniel J. Rader, M.D.

Associate Professor
Department of Medicine
Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
University of Pennsylvania
Email: rader@mail.med.upenn.edu
Website: http://www.med.upenn.edu/apps/faculty/index.php/g20000320/p8944
Laboratory-based research with translation into animal experiments and ultimately into patient-oriented research in the areas of lipoprotein metabolism and premature atherosclerosis. Specific topics are: Inflammatory and genetic factors that regulate the in vivo metabolism of HDL and other lipoproteins; Molecular and cellular mechanisms by which HDL-associated proteins inhibit atherogenesis and induce regression of atherosclerotic lesions; Dietary and genetic regulation of hepatic lipoprotein production; Genetic factors associated with premature atherosclerotic disease and high or low levels of HDL cholesterol.

Anil K. Rustgi, M.D.

Chief, Gastroenterology Division
Department of Medicine
University of Pennsylvania
Email: anil2@mail.med.upenn.edu
Website: http://www.med.upenn.edu/apps/faculty/index.php/g345/p5431
Epithelial cell differentiation and oncogenesis, molecular genetics of GI cancers (upper GI, pancreatic, colon).

Richard Salcido, M.D.

William J. Erdman, II Professor of Rehabilitation Medicine
Chair, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine
University of Pennsylvania
Email: salcidor@mail.med.upenn.edu
Website: http://www.med.upenn.edu/apps/faculty/index.php/g275/p17304
Research and clinical interests in chronic wound care; functional mobility in aging; urinary incontinence.

Jorge Santiago-Aviles, Ph.D.

Associate Professor
Center for Sensor Technologies
Department of Electrical Engineering
University of Pennsylvania
Email: santiago@ee.upenn.edu
Website: http://www.seas.upenn.edu/directory/profile.php?ID=80
His research interest encompasses materials and devices for electronics applications including energy conversion and storage, in particular super-capacitors, nano-composite materials, and deposition methods such as electro-spinning and electrodeposition. His pedagogical interest lies in STEM education and the education of under-served populations.

Douglas H. Smith, M.D.

Director of PENN’s Center for Brain Injury and Repair
The Robert A. Groff Professor of Neurosurgery
Vice Chairman for Research, Department of Neurosurgery
University of Pennsylvania
Email: smithdou@mail.med.upenn.edu
Website: http://www.med.upenn.edu/cbir/DouglasHSmith.shtml
Modeling focal and diffuse brain injury, post-traumatic cognitive dysfunction, traumatic axonal injury, magnetic resonance techniques for diagnosis of brain trauma, and development of brain injury therapies.

Louis J. Soslowsky, Ph.D.

Professor
Departments of Orthopaedic Surgery and Bioengineering
University of Pennsylvania
Email: soslowsk@mail.med.upenn.edu
Website: http://www.seas.upenn.edu/directory/profile.php?ID=151
Orthopaedic biomechanics and tissue engineering: Structure-function studies in tendons and ligaments using transgenic models, tendon and ligament injury, healing, repair, and regeneration models, and biomechanical studies of the shoulder joint.

Ben Stanger, M.D., Ph.D.

Assistant Professor
Department of Medicine
Email: bstanger@mail.med.upenn.edu
Website: http://www.med.upenn.edu/apps/faculty/index.php/g275/p8139400
Our laboratory uses the tools of developmental biology to address problems relevant to development, regenerative medicine and cancer. We use the mouse as a model system to genetically tag specific cellular lineages, or to alter the function of important signaling pathways. The focus is on stem cells and progenitor cells in the vertebrate liver and pancreas, essential organs with great clinical importance and a rich history in developmental biology.

Christian J. Stoeckert, Jr., Ph.D.

Research Professor, Dept. of Genetics
Penn Center for Bioinformatics
University of Pennyslvania
Email: stoeckrt@pcbi.upenn.edu
Website: http://www.cbil.upenn.edu/>www.cbil.upenn.edu
The goal of our work is to help make sense of the enormous amount of biomedical data generated by high-throughput genomic approaches and synthesize them into something more than the sum of the parts. To that end, we are developing tools that enable researchers to mine and integrate data from a variety of different sources and types of experiments.

Phong Tran, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor
Department of Cell & Developmental Biology
University of Pennyslvania
Email: tranp@mail.med.upenn.edu
Website: http://www.med.upenn.edu/apps/faculty/index.php/g20001040/p137332
Our lab is interested in understanding how positional information and pattern formation are generated within the cell by the cytoskeleton. We plan to: 1) identify the molecular components of the microtubule organizing centers, 2) define the interactions of known microtubule-associated-proteins with the microtubule ends and the roles of these proteins in brining about proper nuclear positioning and cellular pattern, and 3) develop and apply advanced optical imaging and analysis methods to the yeast system.

John Q. Trojanowski, M.D., Ph.D.

Professor
Department of Pathology@ Laboratory Medicine
University of Pennyslvania
Email: trojanow@mail.med.upenn.edu
Website: http://www.med.upenn.edu/cndr/JohnTrojanowskibio.shtml
Research currently centers on molecular mechanisms of neuron dysfunction, degeneration and death in normal aging and in neurodegenerative diseases (Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease, frontotemporal dementias with/without parkinsonism, motor neuron disease, etc.). This research uses immunological, biochemical, genetic, molecular and morphological methods to study human CNS and PNS tissue samples (postmortem or surgical), cell lines, synthetic proteins, and transgenic models of neurodegenerative diseases.

Andrew Tsourkas, Ph.D.

Associate Professor
Department of Bioengineering
Department of Radiology
University of Pennyslvania
Email: atsourk@seas.upenn.edu
Website: http://www.seas.upenn.edu/~atsourk/index.html
Our laboratory is interested in developing molecular imaging probes that target these anomalies to locate and study diseased states in vivo. We are developing probes that target a wide range of biological processes including gene regulation, mRNA localization, protein expression, and enzymatic activity. Multiple imaging platforms are used including magnetic resonance, fluorescence, and bioluminescence and applications range from studying the complex intracellular dynamics of individual cells to the early detection of disease in a clinical setting.

Santosh S. Venkatesh, Ph.D.

Associate Professor
Department of Electrical and Systems Engineering
University of PennyslvaniaM
Email: venkatesh@ee.upenn.edu
Website: http://www.seas.upenn.edu/~venkates/
Models of neural computation: complexity, approximation, and learning. Applications of computational learning theory to pattern classification and machine learning. Communication networks and information theory.

Karen I. Winey, Ph.D.

Professor
Department of Materials Science and Engineering
University of Pennsylvania
Email: winey@seas.upenn.edu
Website: http://winey.seas.upenn.edu/
Currently, my research group has one project on the procesing of polymeric systems for controlled adn extended drug delivery. In addition, we are pursuing fundamental studies on the structure-property relationships in nanotube-polymer composite materials adn ion-containing polymers, particularly ionomers. Our experimental expertise includes electron microscopy, x-ray scattering, rheology, and termal analysis.

Beth A. Winkelstein, Ph.D.

Professor
Department of Bioengineering
University of Pennsylvania
Email: winkelst@seas.upenn.edu
Website: http://www.seas.upenn.edu/directory/profile.php?ID=105
Research examines biomechanical mechanisms causing chronic pain and subcatastrophic neck injuries, combining injury biomechanics of the cervical spine/neck with physiology assays of persistent pain. Effots seek to understand injury mechanisms that produce whiplas-related pain & determine the role of biomechanics in CNS neuroimmunologic changes of persistent pain.

Shu Yang, Ph.D.

Professor
Department of Materials Science and Engineering
University of Pennsylvania
Email: shuyang@seas.upenn.edu
Website: http://www.seas.upenn.edu/~shuyang/index.html
Synthesis, characterization and processing of functional materials, including polymers and organic/inorganic hybrids for applications in microelectronics, photonics and biotechnology.

Arjun G. Yodh, Ph.D.

Director and Professor
The Laboratory for Research on the Structure of Matter (LRSM)
University of Pennsylvania
Email: yodh@physics.upenn.edu
Website: http://www.physics.upenn.edu/yodhlab/
Development of novel optical physics, spectroscopy, and microscopy for studies of soft materials ranging from colloids and emulsions to human tissues.

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